Redheart Raven – Debut Show

Today we went to support Redheart Raven (Peyres Catori Cat x DRF Patahas Redheart) debut outing competing in a young stock class at Hulks Farm.

His performance was flawless…huge congratulations to his owner Naomi (who is too young to compete) but to her mother Emma who has never shown before…

A well deserved 2nd place, we are very proud of you ALL, certainly a proud Breeder day.

We are expecting his full sibling VERY SOON!!!!

Remy & Really Restrained via DuraCorral

When mares give birth, their natural instinct is to protect their foals, we would never turn a mare and foal out within a herd from day one and what makes our situation worse in March 2022 is the wet weather and muddy ground. We dare not risk any infection via an umbilical chord with the mud, therefore we have decided to invest in yet more DuraCorral panels to split the ménage into two…

This means not only does our ménage serve as a riding arena (when the daylight hours permit after normal human working hours) and it also refrains our horses eating/chewing the wooden rails but the best benefit at the present time during this awful weather is, it has allowed us to turn the two mares and foals out each evening, whilst we clear out their stables.

We are so close to that extra hour of daylight and irrespective of daylight the mares and foals are turned out daily , providing their bodies and minds with what we consider only of a positive nature.

Here are some images when Remy met Really, well to be honest the mares didn’t allow them to meet but nearly…

A Year With Redheart Result

It is not our desire or goal to cross two homozygous LP Appaloosas, we don’t want to 100% create CSNB horses but when you have two exceptional Appaloosas and all you want is a filly then it’s worth taking the chance. Our 50/50 for gender paid off and we were absolutely delighted to see the safe arrival of the filly Redheart Result on the 23rd February 2021.

The name Result is the meaning behind our goal…and what a RESULT she is, she has the most adorable personality, a small (first maiden foal) but well built and compact and seems to be eventually growing in height!

Today she is a year old and here is a little video of her life here at the stud to date…

Her dam, Talismans Redheart (aka Ghost) has been inseminated with semen from Hevans EV Catorrius (aka Reus) and is is currently 336 days gestation, might we see a sibling on this very day?

Firstly we pray for a healthy mare and foal and ideally a filly to retain, it will be Reus’s first FAHR eligible foal and 100% FPD. We don’t care about the colour or pattern, it will 100% be heterozygous for LP but as Ghost doesn’t carry PATN1, it’s 50/50 if Reus passes his copy over, if he does then we will see spots but if he doesn’t we will see Appaloosa characteristics and the foal will become a varnish roan.

We have three possibilities of colour, black, bay or chestnut, how excited are we!

Redheart Mares – Counting down the foaling days 2022

The 5 Redheart broodmares are looking great, feeling fine and totally relaxed in their routine as we start to count down the days to foaling and pray for the safe arrival of our 2022 foals.

We are expecting two foals from Reus and three foals from Blu, all have full siblings except Reus x Ghost, this will be our first ever Foundation Appaloosa Horse Registry (FAHR) foal from our Catori line. It goes without saying, all we want is a healthy new-born but we would be blessed to see a filly delivered. A filly would be retained for our future breeding plan with Fire or Blu, continuing our path of the UK’s Foundation Appaloosa Stud.

Counting down the foaling days 2022 

 

 

The Class of 2021 – The Window of opportunity…

We initially rely on our mares to help teach the foals to lead and stand.
We take full advantage of a small window of opportunity when the foals only want to follow their dams, when the apron’s strings are broken they are happy to be lead alone.

The Class of 2021 – The First Blade of Grass…

After days out in the ménage the next step for our 2021 foals is turn out in a small paddock. It is hard for them to understand why their dams just want to eat after a quick check of the boundary, a gradual reintroduction to grass for the mares is especially important.
 
After they settle and their heads go down, we wonder what the first blade of grass tastes like for a foal?
 
We are in May and Spring has not arrived, the days have been OK, but the nights are still too cold and wet to leave the foals out. Since birth, each mare and foal have increased time out over a two week period, building up the length of time to reach a full days grazing before coming in for the night.

 

The Class of 2021 – The First Turn-out

In conjunction with Farm & Stable Supplies for supporting the Appaloosa Horse Club (ApHC) UK 2021 Photo Competition. Thank you 🙂

There is no doubt turnout is best for new-born foals, enabling them to develop physically and mentally. All our mare’s and foals have individual turnout in the safety area of the duracorral before they are turned out in the field together.

Here are the first few days of their lives outside the barn…

 

The Class 2021 – THE FIRST 48 HOURS

In conjunction with Farm & Stable Supplies for supporting the Appaloosa Horse Club (ApHC) UK 2021 Photo Competition. Thank you 🙂

Can you imagine being born within 4 walls and then the door is opened, a new environment awaits you but also the realisation of what your legs are for…

Our post foaling check list is quite extensive, but only then can we relax and enjoy our foals knowing we have done our best to ensure their well-being.

Here are some clips from The Class of 2021, showing their characters within in the first 48hrs of life outside the stable.

Here is a little video:

The Class of 2021 – STAGE 3 – Passing The Placenta

In conjunction with Farm & Stable Supplies for supporting the Appaloosa Horse Club (ApHC) UK 2021 Photo Competition. Thank you 🙂

STAGE 3 of foaling is known as delivery of the placenta. The mare’s uterus continues to contract after foaling which causes the placenta to be expelled BUT so much more happens before the placenta is expelled.

So, the foals are safely out, either our mares get up or our foals crawl to their dam’s head but either way the umbilical cord breaks and the foals begin their first mission, to get to their feet. Their second mission is to find the milk bar, both missions are challenging, we only intervene if required to do so.

Our mares’ bond with their foals by licking, nuzzling, and nickering to them, it is wonderful to watch.

During the processes of the foals’ natural instincts, to stand and feed, the mare’s body is constantly experiencing the pain of contractions, the ultimate result we wait for is a placenta that is completely intact.

Once we are satisfied the foal has properly latched on and nursed, the foal has urinated and passed the meconium and most of all the placenta is intact, only then do we leave them, knowing we have done everything possible to ensure a great start to their new life.

Here’s a little video: